Tag Archives: curry laksa

Eat to your heart’s content when you are in Taman Eng Ann

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Hari ini dalam sejarah

My father’s driving licence in early ’70’s when Taman Eng Ann was known as Eng Ann Estate where our family house was in No. 10, Jalan Merbok.

Perhaps Taman Eng Ann was one of the oldest if not the oldest Taman in Klang.

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These are some of my classmates since 1971 when we were in standard 1 from School 1 in Taman Eng Ann School and this year we celebrated our 46 years of friendship.

The school we were in was built in the early 1960s, started operating in 1963 and was previously called Sekolah Rendah Kebangsaan Jenis Inggeris Jalan Batu Tiga, Klang.
In 1967, the school was divided into School 1 and School 2 as to accomodate the increase in pupils.

Today the school is called S K (1) Jalan Batu Tiga, Taman Eng Ann, Klang.


Breakfast

All happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast.

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This Hainanese coffee shop is bestowed with slightly more than half a century’s worth of legacy in Taman Eng Ann of Klang. It was known as Heng Lee Coffee Shop back in 1963. This is the only coffee shop which I still have memory of when I was still residing there until mid of 1973 when we moved out. At that time I was only 8 years old.

Breakfast here is an ensemble of thickly brewed coffee, tea or Hainanese Tea which in its essence should be renamed to ‘cham’ and not forgetting the half-boiled eggs with runny yolks to envelop the toasted breads sandwiching a cold slab of butter and ‘kaya’.

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Lunch

When people you greatly admire appear to be thinking deep thoughts, they probably are thinking about lunch.

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Pan Mee, literally means flat noodles. With the help of a noodle flattener, the dough can be extruded to flat noodle strands – thick or thin. The strands of noodles are then cooked in a boiling broth and served together with all the other essential ingredients.

In this stall this young lad offer something which is not common – the charcoal and pumpkin pan mee. I prefer the charcoal done in the dry version and the pumpkin with broth. Yummy!


Dinner

My favorite thing is to have a good dinner with friends and talk about life.

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The Chicken Rice is served with sliced cucumber, homemade chili sauce and pounded ginger and dark soy sauce. There are different variants of rice as well, including the aromatic ‘oily rice’ and the rice balls. Chicken rice must be accompanied with a bowl of soup and we ordered additional chicken gizzards and livers. As for the chicken itself we opted for the free range chicken.


Supper

After dinner we wait for a while and after supper we walk for a mile.

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Mamak culture

You can’t claim to have been to Malaysia if you have not visited a Mamak stall. The Mamak Phenomenon is the hottest, and probably the longest lasting “cultural” scene in the country. To see and understand the true meaning of “melting pot”, you’ve got to pop by at the Mamak stalls when in the neighborhood.

The term ‘Mamak’ is widely used to describe Indian Muslims. Its known to be a confluence of Indian and Malay culture and is derived from the Tamil word for maternal uncle, or ‘maa-ma’.

Typically the locals including Chinese and Malays sometimes call the Mamaks, “Ah neh”, which means brother as a mark of respect. The Malays, address them as “Bang” which is the short form of “Abang”, meaning brother.

The Mamak culture is extremely popular among young adults and teenagers who find it a safe place to hang out with friends during the night and also because it is quite affordable. The modern Mamak stalls have a cafe aspect, which are furnished with decent seating arrangement and televisions which lets them catch the latest programs or live matches as they dine.

Most Mamak stalls start their business at about 5 PM and remain open till midnight, and the ones that are similar to cafes usually operate 24 hours a day.

This Mamak stall beside 99 Supermart in Taman Eng Ann is one of the oldest here.

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This Mamak stall serve some delectable delicacies like Roti Canai, Nasi Lemak, Mee Goreng, Mamak Rojak, Thosai, Indo-Mee, Ayam Goreng, Teh Tarik and more.


 

Medan Selera Taman Eng Ann

A convenient place to indulge in a wide range of good quality and tasty street food at a low cost. A fantastic food court where you can get anything from a snack, a desert to a full meal predominantly Chinese Malaysian dishes.

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This place is usually super packed with hungry people during peak hours.

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2 of the most popular stalls – the Popiah and Yong Tau Foo stalls.

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Popiah, Asam Laksa, Curry Laksa and Kedondong Juice.

Lin Chee Kang and Chendol

Basically there are more items here that are good like the mixed fried noodles, Char Kueh Teow, Chicken Rice, fried banana fritters and such, Beef noodles and much more.


 

Bak Kut Teh

How can I blog about the good food in Taman Eng Ann without mentioning Bak Kut Teh at all. Fortunately we have a fantastic restaurant offering just that.

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I like the dry Bak Kut Teh which were prepared with dried chilies and cuttlefish with the addition of fried shallots to give it a boost of aroma. It’s also a lot spicier as well.

As for the soup version I prefer them to be in the bowl rather than in the claypot as to maintain the original taste of the thick aromatic spice broth. As for the meat choices if you order the ribs and big bone you can never go wrong.


 

Chee Cheong Fun/Yong Tau Foo

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Chee cheong fun, or rice rolls, are one of the most accepted and loved Chinese dishes in our nation. Chee cheong fun are essentially steamed rice rolls that are served with a savoury or sweet sauce. The Cantonese version (or Hong Kong Chee Cheong Fun) is usually filled with either prawns or mince. Our local version, instead, is hollow but served with sesame seeds and a prawn pasted based spicy-sweet sauce.

Yong tau foo is of Hakka origin where fish paste is used as stuffing in tofu, bitter gourd, brinjal and fresh chilli.

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The selection of Yong Tau Foo here is among the biggest I’ve seen anywhere. There’s green chili, brinjal, bitter gourd, fuchok, pork skin, various types of fishball/meatball, deep fried stuff, tofu, cuttle fish, and even kangkung, spoilt for choices really.

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This is a family run business and so you can rest assured that the quality of food is consistent and taste great all the time.


 

Taman Eng Ann is a food heaven for food lovers and when you are there just find the first place available to park your car as parking can be a difficult chore. On the plus sign every eatery are only a stone throw away from each other.

Bon Appetite!

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Curry Chee Cheong Fun – Ah Yee Curry Mee

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Ah Yee Curry Mee, or 阿姨咖喱面 is located along Jalan Kepong Baru opposite a surau in Taman Kepong, the street surrounded by many other Chinese street food which are famous too.

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Chee Cheong Fun is the highlighted here, and of course it is popular with a reason. What makes Ah Yee Curry Mee Chee Cheong Fun noteworthy would probably be the flat rice noodles itself which is smooth, with more chews. It is freshly prepared by a noodle factory using owner’s special recipe, only for Ah Yee Curry Mee stall.

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The Curry Kueh Teow is equally good with lots of ingredients and almost raw cockles.

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They are very generous with the curry broth because this are the 2 dishes that are most popular with the customers. Tasted really good especially the Curry Chee Cheong Fun.

 

Ah Yee Curry Mee 阿姨咖喱面 (Opposite Surau Taman Kepong)

Jalan Kepong Baru,

Kepong,

40150 Kuala Lumpur.

Curry Laksa – Mobile Food Seller

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This is the closes photo resembling the man who once sold curry laksa in South Port in Klang. Yesteryear mobile food seller with his iconic solid hat.

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The current generation still selling the same curry laksa and still mobile in a way

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My father used to take me to the  South Port where he works in those days inside the port and adjacent to the port was the only kopitiam and restaurant where this curry laksa seller brings his stuffs there daily to sell. Today the place is no longer in existence.

Till today the curry laksa still taste the same and just as good as those days. You have to try it because it’s different from the other curry laksa.

Boon Poh Restoran

47, Jalan Beringin,

42000 Port Klang

Selangor

Curry Laksa – Restaurant Sun Yin Loong

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The curry is thick and aromatic, with just the right amount of spice to give it an extra kick. The curry noodles at Sun Yin Loong are also served with a hearty, tasty portion of roast pork. The dry version is also available before and after the curry runs out which is most of the time. When we were there before 1pm we only managed to get one bowl of the wet version and the rest the dry version.

Restaurant Sun Yin Loong

41-01, Jalan PJU 1/3c,

Sunway Mas Commercial Center,

Aman Suria,

47301 Petaling Jaya,

Selangor